U.S. Corporations and Terrorism

Kyle de Beausset, of Immigration Orange, has been Blogging on an issue that has to do with the recent revelation that the Chiquita Brands International company paid 1.7 million dollars to right-wing paramilitaries (a designated global terrorist group) for eight years in Colombia to protect their interests and their personnel. And, there are other American companies who’ve allegedly done the same thing including Drummond (coal giant), Nestle and Coca-Cola.

Kyle’s post on this references a story in the Christian Science Monitor which details Chiquita’s admission of the payments. Kyle has asked other Bloggers to post on this as well because the story has been getting virtually zero traction in the U.S. popular press. In fact, the silence in the main stream media, as they say, has been deafening.

I strongly agree with Kyle on this issue. I think it is wrong for US companies to pay terrorist groups for protection.

Perhaps these companies get ‘protected’ for their money but along the way they are also putting big dollars into the hands of these groups. And that can only strengthen the ability of the groups to implement their agendas – and let’s be clear, these are terrorist agendas.

I hope people will follow these links and familiarize themselves with this seriously under-reported story. And, I admire Kyle for taking this issue on.

3 Responses to “U.S. Corporations and Terrorism”

  1. […] Closer 8. Islamophobia Watcher 9. The Garlic 10. aTypical Joe 11. Vox Ameliae 12. NoisyRoom 13. Samadhisoft 14. Writeous Sister Speaks 15. Chromed Curses 16. Lucky White Girl 17. Foreign Perpectives 18. […]

  2. […] Closer 8. Islamophobia Watcher 9. The Garlic 10. aTypical Joe 11. Vox Ameliae 12. NoisyRoom 13. Samadhisoft 14. Writeous Sister Speaks 15. Chromed Curses 16. Lucky White Girl 17. Foreign Perpectives 18. […]

  3. […] Closer 8. Islamophobia Watcher 9. The Garlic 10. aTypical Joe 11. Vox Ameliae 12. NoisyRoom 13. Samadhisoft 14. Writeous Sister Speaks 15. Chromed Curses 16. Lucky White Girl 17. Foreign Perpectives 18. […]